Speech Resources

Hi everyone!  Myself and Miss Starla will be using this page to share with you activities that you can use to target speech goals.  Please make use of these universal speech strategies and I hope your child enjoys the stories, activities and games!  We will keep this page updated with new activities at the top of the page, so keep your eye on it!  You can expect a few new activities at the end of every week.

Characteristics and Attributes Detective Game:

First, print off these animal pictures: Animal pictures

Using the pictures linked above you can say to your child, “I am thinking of one of these animals. I am going to give you some clues and you can be the detective and see if you can guess which animal I am thinking about.” 

  1. Give general clues first, such as colour and size.
  2. Give one more clue that is a little more specific, such as habitat.
  3. That last clue can be a dead give away, such as the noise it makes.

You can reverse roles and give the child a turn to think of the animal and you can be the detective.  You can find other items or animal pictures so that it can become more challenging.  If this is too difficult, you can first talk about the animal attributes and give your child the vocabulary. You can also make this game more difficult and encourage abstract thinking by not using pictures.

K Sound Bingo

Our K sound comes from the back of our throat. We put our tongue up slightly at the back and we keep our tongue down in the front to make the sound.  If your child is having difficulty with remembering where to place the sound, you can prompt the child by placing a finger on the throat while saying the sound. If this is a challenge, you can prompt the child to keep their tongue down at the front by placing a tongue depressor or a sucker on the tip of the tongue to remind it to stay down.

Start by saying the K sound 5 times.

How to play:

  • Print off two copies of the bingo sheets and cut the squares of one out.  
  • The adult will choose a square and say the word, really emphasizing the K sound. The child can repeat the word before placing the square over the correct tile on the bingo sheet. 
  • If your child is saying the word correctly have them repeat the word 5 times before placing the square over the correct tile on the bingo sheet.
  • Once the child becomes more efficient at the K sound you can make up a sentence with the K word before placing the square over the correct tile.

_k_ sound BINGO

S Blend Bingo

To produce the S sound we need to keep our teeth together and hide our tongue behind our teeth.  We then use our air to make the “hissy” sound. I will often prompt children by placing my finger at the top of the child’s shoulder and slide it down the child’s arm while making a hissy sound. I do this when the child is saying a word with an S blend as well, but I start at the wrist without the S.  For instance, for the word ‘stop’, I tap the wrist and say, “top.” Then I have the child repeat the word top, making sure to emphasize the ‘T.’ Once the child is saying top, then add the hissy sound to make ‘stop’ by sliding your finger down the child’s arm and when you get to the bottom add the top to make ‘stop’.  If it is difficult to keep the tongue behind the teeth you may use a mirror to remind them to do so.

Start by saying the S sound 5 times.

How to play:

  • Print off two copies of the bingo sheets and cut the squares of one out.  
  • The adult will choose a square and say the word, really emphasizing the S sound. The child can then repeat the word and place the square over the correct tile on the bingo sheet.
  • If your child is saying the word correctly have them repeat the word 5 times before placing the square over the correct tile on the bingo sheet.
  • Once the child becomes more efficient at the S sound you can make up a sentence with the S word before placing the square over the correct tile.

s blends BINGO

Language Development Activity:

First, listen to the story read by Miss Starla:

After listening to the story, have your child follow along with the video below and answer questions about the story with Miss Starla.  This is such a great way to develop our ability to retell stories!

Story for target sounds:

Listen to this story read by Miss Starla and join her in saying all of the target sounds!

 

 

Activity to target front sounds and back sounds:

First, watch the video of Miss Starla explaining how to complete this activity to target front sounds- /t/ and back sounds /k/ and then print off the picture cards and try this activity at home!

k-t minimal pair sound cards

 

 

G Sound Go Fish

Like our K we keep our tongue slightly up at the back of our throat and the tip of the tongue down.  You may use a mirror for the child to watch themselves while they practice.  If this is difficult, you can use a tongue depressor or a sucker to keep the tongue down at the front.

Practice the sound 5 times.

Using the link provided print off two copies of the g word sheet and cut out the squares.

g sounds cards

Start with simple words with one syllable or words that your child is successful at before adding some more challenging words. Allow your child to practice the words that you have chosen.

Deal each player 4 cards. Place the rest of the cards in the middle of the table. Ask your child for a match to one of the cards in your hand by asking, “Can I have a …?” Emphasize the C in can and the G in the g-sound word.  If the child has the card, they will pass it to you and say the word.  If they do not have the card, they would say, “Go fish.”  Try to emphasize each g sound until they become more proficient at using the sound.  If they make a mistake, have them “fix” it.  You can encourage them by saying things like, “good try,” or “nice fix.” You can also ask them things like, “Did you want a dift or a gift?” Have fun with this game while bringing awareness to the child saying the word correctly or incorrectly.

You can also use these cards to play a memory game. Using the cards with the words that your child is successful at, flip them all upside down and take turns finding their mates by flipping over two cards at a time. Have the child say the word as they flip each card over. Once they have said each word, if they do not match, flip them back over and then move to the next person. If the cards match, that person removes the cards. Keep taking turns until all the mates are found.

Sh Sound Memory Game with Sh at the End of the Word

Practice making the sh sound. (The quiet sound.) Place one finger on the lips and make the sound Shhhhhhhhh.  Use a mirror to make sure the lips are shaped correctly.  

Print and cut out two copies of the sh words. 

/sh/ picture cards

Practice words five times each. Start with one syllable and simple words, or words that your child is successful at, before progressing to the more difficult ones.  Emphasize the sh sound at the end of each word and place your fingers on your mouth as a prompt. The child may need you to slow it down in order to transition to the sh sound. For example;

Pu      shhhhhhh

Lea    shhhhhhh

Wi      shhhhhhh

Tra     shhhhhhh

Playing the Memory Game

Using the cards with the words that your child is successful at, flip them all upside down and take turns finding their mates by flipping over two cards at a time. Have the child say the word as they flip each card over. Once they have said each word, if they do not match, flip them back over and then move to the next person. If the cards match, that person removes the cards. Keep taking turns until all the mates are found.  Try to emphasize each sh sound until they become more proficient at using the sound.  If they make a mistake, have them “fix” it.  You can encourage them by saying things like, “good try,” or “nice fix.” You can also ask them things like, “Did you want a dit or a dish?” Have fun with this game while bringing awareness to the child saying the word correctly or incorrectly.

Activity to target language: listening to a story and then retelling and answering questions about the story.

First, have your child listen to the story “The Very Cranky Bear” through this link.

The Very Cranky Bear read aloud

Then, have your child follow along with this video from Miss Starla where she asks questions about the story.  Pause the story and help your child with the questions before continuing with the video.  It is so important to not only listen to stories but to retell familiar stories and ask questions about them to develop our language and vocabulary.

 

Miss Starla asks questions about The Very Cranky Bear

Activity to target the back sound /k/:

Follow along with Miss Starla’s video of Kicky Kangaroo and say the /k/ sound with her.

 

I have included a Kangaroo colouring page that you could print and have your child colour to go with the story and as a visual while Miss Starla is reading about the kangaroo.

Kangaroo Colouring Page